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Totem Pole Journey Against Coal and Oil Exports (Seattle)

Friday, August 29th, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm, Aug 29th 2014

Our Shared Responsibility—A Journey against Coal and Oil!

The mining, transport and burning of coal and oil threaten the lands, waters, resources and human health of all of us who live in the Northwest, but none more so than the indigenous people who sit right in the path of destruction.

The proposed Cherry Point coal terminal, would sit right on the ancestral lands of the Lummi Nation known as Xwe’chi’eXen. The mining of that coal would also destroy Northern Cheyenne lands in Montana, and all along the way fossil fuel transport would harm the fishing and treaty rights of Native Americans. This is only one of several ill-conceived coal and oil shipment proposals for our region.

In protest to these dirty and dangerous proposals members of the Lummi Community will embark on a journey, Our Shared Responsibility-the Land, the Waters, the People, to empower and inform communities all along the rail line, and bring a new level of understanding and engagement to successfully oppose the proposed shipment of an unprecedented volume of coal and oil from the American heartland to the Pacific Coast.

When: Friday, August 29th, 10:30 am—12:30 pm 

Where: St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral 1245 10th Ave East

Who: Head Carver of the House of Tears, Jewell James; King County Executive, Dow Constantine; and Bishop Greg Rickel, Eight Bishop of the Diocese of Olympia

A totem pole, created by the Lummi Nation House of Tears carvers and one of the oldest forms of North American storytelling, will join the journey to remind us of our place within nature, our responsibility to future generations, and our connections to each other and to our communities.

The Lummi Community will bring this totem to communities across the Northwest. At the ceremony, the totem pole will be blessed by tribal elders, by community leaders and YOU! The Lummi ask for blessing and protection of sacred lands and treaty rights, including their own ancestral village and treaty fishing waters at Cherry Point, WA.

In the testimony of Master Carver Jewell James, the totem itself is not sacred -- it is only when it is touched and shared by many communities standing together that the totem becomes a lasting part of our memories and a symbol of our resistance.

So please join us in this unique, indigenous event and let the Lummi community know that we stand with them in the fight against fossil fuels and we share the responsibility to protect the land, the waters, and the peoples of the Northwest.

For more information visit www.totempolejourney.org

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