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Marten Seen at Hyak Creek

In May, a remote camera set up by Conservation Northwest photographed a pine marten in the forest along Hyak Creek, between two of the Snoqualmie Pass ski areas. Martens require wild country with deep forest and down woody debris – habitat that would suffer if the proposed ski area expansion between Hyak and Summit Central were approved. The wildlife corridors proposed at Snoqualmie Pass are important for the survival of pine martens and other wildlife in the central Cascades.

Wolverine Tracks Near Pass

In February, University of Washington students found a set of tracks in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness three miles west of Snoqualmie Pass that appears to be wolverine. At about the same time, Washington Dept of Wildlife biologists live-trapped a female wolverine in the Pasayten Wilderness. In recent years there have been other credible sightings in the Alpine Lakes area including one in upper Gold Creek. These are evidence that these wide ranging, yet elusive mammals still inhabit the Washington Cascades. But wolverines require wild country with little human disturbance. The wildlife corridors proposed at Snoqualmie Pass are important for their survival in the central Cascades.